May 30, 2013

Bangalore Best Indian city to live in

Bangalore Best Indian city to live in

Vienna has been ranked as the world's best city to live in on the global list, which has five Indian cities - Bangalore (141st), New Delhi (143rd), Mumbai (144th), Chennai (150th) and Kolkata (151st).


Despite its top Indian ranking, Bangalore's worldwide rank is very low at 141st position in a list of 221 cities globally in terms of standard of living, compiled by the 'Quality of Living Survey - Worldwide Rankings, 2011' by the global HR (human resources) consultancy major Mercer.


If you wonder about Bangalore, how the city used to be and where it is headed, this is the piece you must read. Despite divisions, the city appears to be miraculously free of the fatalism seen elsewhere.

“You know you’re in Bangalore, you know you’re in the Silicon Valley of India, when you go to play golf and the caddy on the first tee says you can either aim at the Microsoft building or the IBM building. You know you’re in Bangalore when you see the Pizza Hut advertisement says ‘gigabytes of taste’,” famously said the US journalist Thomas Friedman in 2004. Ever since, reams have been written on outsourcing, the software boom and the rise of the uber-smart, uber-rich new technogeeks of Bangalore.


An upmarket mall in the Koramangala, IT heartland. Pic: Meera Iyer.


As a city, Bangalore was industrialised fairly early on. Sir M Visvesvaraya, Diwan of Mysore state during the early 1900s, spurred this process with his belief in the maxim, Industrialise or perish. Several technical and academic institutions, including the Indian Institute of Science, were subsequently established in Bangalore. Later, during the 1940s and 1950s, the city saw the establishment of several large public- and private-sector industries, including Hindustan Aeronautics, Bharat Earth Movers and Indian Telephone Industries.

Still further on, Bangalore became a centre for the automotive industry, with the establishment of the Motor Industries Company, a collaboration with the German company Bosch. The Indian Space Research Organisation came to Bangalore during the 1970s. By then, with its tradition of knowledge-based industries and academic excellence well established, Bangalore was thoroughly primed to exploit the coming computer revolution.


“If you live here, work here, eat here, if you respect this place and its culture, you are a Bangalorean.”

- Velu K, an autorickshaw driver


Despite the number of glitzy malls and departmental stores, many people still prefer shopping in street markets like this one in Basavanagudi. Pic: Meera Iyer.

The greater cause of resentment, however, is the perceived erosion of the importance of Kannada. Most upper-class migrants, such as ‘Subroto’ (name changed on request), who works as a software manager in a multinational company, feel no need to learn Kannada, which is important only if one needs to “talk to an autorickshaw driver, milkman or vegetable vendor.” A visibly distressed Y M Balakrishna, the former head of a research and development unit at the Motor Industries Company and a long-time resident of Basavanagudi says, “If you go to Gandhi Bazaar (a bustling market nearby), you hear Tamil, Hindi and Telugu – but no Kannada. I don’t know where all the Kannadigas are – perhaps they have gone abroad?”

 “If you go to Gandhi Bazaar, you hear Tamil, Hindi and Telugu – but no Kannada. I don’t know where all the Kannadigas are – perhaps they have gone abroad?”
- Y M Balakrishna, former head of a research and development unit at the Motor Industries Company (MICO)


Economic divide

If language divides in Bangalore, so do economics and geography. As the city’s IT sector was growing by leaps and bounds, so too were its slums. Official statistics vary, with some sources like the 2001 census giving a figure of 733 slums and others, like the City Development Plan of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission of 2006 giving a figure of 542 slums with a population of 1.4 million. But unofficial estimates from civil-society organisations, such as the Alternative Law Forum and the Citizens Voluntary Initiative for the City (CIVIC), estimate that there are actually closer to 1000 slums today, housing a third of the city’s population.

In addition, according to Kathyayini Chamaraj of CIVIC, there are approximately 800,000 construction workers who are often ‘hidden away’ on construction sites. Most slums and construction-site staff quarters have no proper toilets, roads, streetlights or garbage-disposal, and lack access to drinking water.

A little girl from a lower middle class neighbourhood watches the 32 floor upscale Lakeside Habitat apartment building that exists close-by.
(Pic: Vivek Muthuramalingam)


Any way you look at it, this situation has only become worse since Bangalore morphed into India’s Silicon Valley. “The rich enjoy a degree of luxury unimaginable earlier, while the poor have become poorer,” says Kathyayini. Wages have not kept pace with the cost of living, which has spiralled so high that, for most urban poor, there is little left over at the end of the day to spend on health or education. Kathyayini cites work by sociologists that shows that urban poor households can earn Rs.5100 or more a month, but only if all members of the family work, including the children.

Even so, there is usually a shortfall every month, which is made up through informal sources of credit such as chit funds and moneylenders, with the latter charging anywhere between 60-120 percent interest. The situation forces others to turn to prostitution. In fact, according to a 2007 study by German social scientist Christoff Dittirch, 30 percent of Bangalore’s population survives on a monthly household income of just Rs.2250 or less. At the other end of the spectrum, just two percent of Bangaloreans have a monthly household income of more than Rs.83,000, or about 37 times more than the bottom 30 percent. 


Quarters for construcution staff working on a high-rise apartment block in Bangalore. The open ground behind the quarters serves as the toilet. Pic: Meera Iyer.

Government initiatives for the urban poor are few and far between. Perhaps symptomatic of the attitude is the Bangalore Development Authority’s Comprehensive Development Plan of 2005, which omitted mentioning slums altogether, instead referring euphemistically to “shadow areas”. Meanwhile, even as funds flow towards urban infrastructure projects that enhance Bangalore’s image as a ‘global city’, the poor and their problems fall increasingly off the radar.

For example, in the recent state budget released this July, Bangalore received Rs.240 crores for road improvement, Rs.350 crores for the construction of 10 flyovers and underpasses on just a single road, Rs.700 crores for the city’s showpiece metro rail project (construction of which began last year, with an estimated total cost of almost Rs.6400 crores), an unspecified amount of money for 40 multilevel car parks and plans for a 65-km ring road costing Rs.3000 crores.

Meanwhile, allocation for housing programmes for all of Karnataka – which would include slum improvement and housing for the poor in Bangalore – stands at just Rs.820 crores. “The government’s idea of development is at significant variance with what development experts think of as development,” says Kathyayini. “They only think of flyovers and expressways, not of enabling human development.”

Clifton Rozario of the Alternative Law Forum says the lack of political will to work for the urban poor cuts across party lines. As an example, he cites an earlier government’s Bangalore Agenda Task Force, through which “the government solicited all advice on Bangalore’s development from the heads of IT companies – but not from anyone else. The problems of the poor are lost in the glitz of IT.”

Lower and lower-middle income housing with no open spaces. In the distance are some high-end apartments and glass-fronted IT office buildings. (Pic: Meera Iyer)

It is not as if the city’s rich are completely unaware of the economic disparities. A few in the upper echelons do feel that while there is indeed more money circulating in the lower sections of Bangalorean society today, it has certainly not been shared equitably. But such is the case “anywhere in the world”, says ‘Subroto’. “And what is the definition of a fair share?” he adds. There are also firm believers in the trickle-down theory. “We eat out every week, we go shopping … definitely, the money is reaching an end-user somewhere,” says Durga Prasad, a vice-president in one of the city’s top IT firms. “If you compare an autorickshaw driver with a techie, of course there will be a difference between the two. But if you compare a driver here with a driver in Vishakapatnam, then the Bangalore driver is definitely better off.” Adds Shwetha Krishnan, whose husband is in the IT industry, “People have full-time maids nowadays, and someone to look after their babies, someone to look after old people … things are very, very different from the 1980s.”

Ezhumallai, a vendor who sells fruit in front of the Bull Temple in one of Bangalore’s oldest suburbs, Basavanagudi, is one of those who see things a bit differently. An operation some years ago left him with a large scar running down his stomach, and an inability to walk or push his cart long distances. The software boom “hasn’t really affected me”, he begins uncertainly, before trailing off. Then he adds, “Except that the price of everything has gone up. I have two children to look after, as well as a wife and a mother. How can I keep pace?”

It is a plaint that is echoed by many. “Rents are up, food is costlier. It is very difficult to manage with an honest day’s work anymore,” says Ravishankar, who works as an office boy in a small transportation company. “Unke liye to fayda hua, hamare liye to nuksan hi nuksan,” says Syed Saleim, an autorickshaw driver. “They have gained, but for us it was only pain.” But hasn’t the influx of people and money led to more business for him? Saleim chuckles, “You think they travel by autos?”

A mushrooming middle-class housing area with no parks, playgrounds or open spaces. (Pic: Meera Iyer)

A major casualty of the expansion of Bangalore has been its open spaces. A city that earlier went by the sobriquet of ‘Garden City’, and was traditionally known for its many parks and lakes, today offers about half of its population less than a single square metre of open space per capita – several times lower than the World Health Organisation’s recommended minimum of 11 square metres. In contrast, the National Capital Region of Delhi has roughly 17 square metres of green space per capita.

Remaining green areas, such as Lalbagh and Cubbon Park, are indeed used by many. Saleim, for instance, says that he likes to spend a free day now and then with his family at the latter, because “you don’t need money to get in.” Both these large parks have gradually been whittled down over the years, while several smaller parks have succumbed entirely to real-estate pressures; in their place have sprung up roads, flyovers, sewage-treatment plants, government offices, places of worship, tennis courts and houses. Or, they have merely been made unavailable for anything other than jogging and walking, activities in which only the upper sections of society indulge.

Two percent of Bangaloreans have a monthly household income of more than Rs.83,000, or about 37 times more than the bottom 30 percent.

This crush has been repeatedly shown to be bad for an urban area’s overall health. As D S Ravindran, a Conservator of Forests in the Karnataka state government, says, “Open spaces like parks and playgrounds are important not just for health reasons like ventilation, but are also vital for social interactions and the general quality of life in a city.”

Some migrant labourers such as Lalit Kumar, who hails from Darchula District in Nepal, wish the city had more parks. “The markets are nice,” says Lalit, “but there is no greenery here, no places you can go to.” But Shilpi Mathur, a young software engineer, speaks for the majority when she notes that the absence of greenery may be how a community “pays the price for growth”. Evidently, wider roads with the promise of easier commutes are more important than the trees that might have to be axed to make them.

Indeed, it is precisely this perception that NGOs in the city, such as the Environment Support Group (ESG) and Hasiru Usiru (which loosely translates as ‘Greenery is Life’), have been actively trying to change. Vijay Narnapatti, of Hasiru Usiru, suggests that while “the majority experiences and appreciates the trees, for many, this experience may remain in the subconscious, without being expressed.” The solution, Narnapatti feels, might be to increase exposure and organise more awareness campaigns. But according to ESG’s Leo Saldanha, more than lack of awareness, it could be Bangalore’s somewhat apathetic ‘wait and watch’ culture that impedes wider public participation on these issues. The silver lining: the younger and newer residents of Bangalore are among those who are more responsive than the older generation, and are willing to stand up against the loss of green spaces.

A busy street in bustling Gandhi Bazaar area. (Pic: Meera Iyer)

Along with the reduced greenery and public space, Bangalore is also witnessing an erosion of its built heritage, both of which have perhaps contributed to a disconnect with the city for some residents. When Evelin Hust moved to Bangalore from Delhi to take over as director of the Max Mueller Bhavan, one of her first impressions of the city was that it seemed to have lost much of its identity. “Or maybe because of the traffic crises, people don’t want to move around much,” she adds, “so their engagement with the city is rather low.” This apparent loss of identity was what prompted the Max Mueller Bhavan’s recent series of heritage walks in the city. “Heritage is so much a part of one’s identity that we thought we should start with that to establish an identity,” Hust explains.

Like in other Indian cities, public spaces have shrunk, and young people in Bangalore with plenty of time and money to spare, have sought out other ways of spending both. Hanging out at Forum, an upmarket mall seems to be one particular favourite. “Have money, will shop. Have no money, will gawk!” jokes Aparna, who also likes spending time in the many restaurants and cafes that dot the city, where “you can relax over authentic German apple strudel”.

But, a lot of other Bangaloreans are decidedly uncomfortable with the habits of the young rich – Rohini Donkar, a nursery teacher says “All this mall culture is just a blind aping of the West”; and office boy Ravishankar squirms when he talks about the “free mixing of boys and girls…it is their money and their business, but how can I say it is alright.”

Moving with the times

Bangalore Now!!!

Bangalore now, by Narasimha Vedala.

Despite these inherent conflicts across the economic divide, there is a discernible pride in living in a city that has had such epithets showered on it as the ‘City of the Future’.

With the lure of opportunities and jobs in the city, there is little talk of packing up and leaving Bangalore anytime soon. For unskilled migrants, there is the increasing push of agrarian crises, low wages and unemployment in rural areas. A daily wage of Rs.75 in Bangalore remains attractive compared to the Rs.25 that many were receiving in their hometowns. Madhu, 22, currently working as a driver for a businessman, came to Bangalore three years ago from his village in Hassan District, with a small bag of clothes and little else. After a few weeks of working as a waiter in a small hotel, a few months as an assistant to a chemist and two years as a taxi driver, he now talks about his plans to buy his own car. “This city can be frightening at times, especially when you have no friends, and no money,” he says. “But thankfully, I was lucky. Now I can ask my parents to move here with me.”

In Bangalore, for every lucky Madhu, there is no doubt an unlucky someone else. But despite the ostentation and a growing gap between the two ends of the income spectrum, Bangalore continues to miraculously free itself of disaffection and fatalism. Janaki Nair, a historian, contrasts the situation in Bangalore with that in Calcutta, where she says, economic disparity has led to utter resignation among the lower classes. In Bangalore, though there are murmurs of resentment, most, like Madhu, dwell instead on their plans and hopes of eventually partaking in some of the wealth.

Globally, Vienna is followed by Zurich, Auckland, Munich, Dusseldorf, Vancouver, Frankfurt, Geneva, Copenhagen and Bern among the top-ranked cities in terms of quality of living, Mercer said.

In another list of the world's best cities in terms of personal safety standards, Luxembourg has been placed on the top, followed by Bern, Helsinki, Zurich, Vienna, Geneva and Stockholm.

On this list, Indian cities have been ranked a little better, as Bangalore has got 117th place, New Delhi and Kolkata shared the 127th position, Mumbai is at 142 and Chennai is placed at 108th.

The personal safety ranking has been on measures of internal stability, crime levels, law enforcement effectiveness and host-country's international relations.

A host of Indian and foreign IT companies, as also many multinational companies from other sectors, have set up shop in Bangalore for their outsourcing and R&D (research and development units).

On the other hand, Mumbai plays host to the companies mostly from the financial services sector, being the financial capital of the country, while New Delhi's attraction has been its status as the national capital. Chennai and Kolkata are have also been catching up fast in the recent past as major industrial hubs within the country.


Like all major Indian cities, Bangalore - a metropolis of about 5 million people on southern India's Deccan Plateau - is a sprawl of decaying single-story houses and shops, Soviet-style apartment buildings, crumbling colonial offices, and abominable shantytowns that extend miles into the countryside. The potholed roads look like they've been hit by an air strike. People are everywhere, lounging on their front stoops, buying goat carcasses, gliding through the crowded streets in colorful saris. Poverty is everywhere, too: Through the van's window I see an orange-clad devotee of Shiva the Destroyer begging for change, two cripples on all fours, and a leper with half a leg and rotting hands.

The source of these contrasts is Bangalore's digital economy, which in recent years has gone from being a sort of novelty act - Hey, India has a Silicon Valley! - to a humming, world-class engine of wealth. Bangalore is now home to 300 high tech companies that employ 40,000 people. Combined, these enterprises - plus the firms in lesser hubs like Mumbai (formerly Bombay), Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, and Pune - pumped out software and computer-related services to the tune of 176 billion rupees ($4 billion) last year. High tech accounted for 15 percent of the market capitalization on India's premier stock market, the Mumbai stock exchange.

India is also making a splash in American markets. A year ago, one Bangalore-based firm, Infosys Technologies, debuted on the Nasdaq exchange, becoming the first Indian company to appear on a US stock market. Opening at 373/8, Infosys stock was pushing $300 in late 1999. John Wall, president and COO of Nasdaq International, says more of the same is on the way, because American investors have finally figured out that India is loaded with highly trained IT professionals. So thrilled is Nasdaq that it recently led a press trip to tour some of the hottest companies and expose American reporters to the Bangalore vibe. "We've only seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of what's out there in Bangalore," Wall says. "In the next 24 months you'll see a dozen more Indian IT firms list with us. They're already in the pipeline."

The effects of the Bangalore explosion - boomtown riches dropped into the middle of a third-world city - are dramatic, varied, and often unsettling, but one thing's for sure: A lot more people want in. Balbir Singh, a salesman who has no background in technology, hopes to make it as a dot-com player himself. He's the founder of a fledgling Web site (www.koramangala.com) devoted to the people, businesses, and news of Koramangala, the southside neighborhood that's home to most of Bangalore's software companies. I happened across his site and emailed him before I left for India. Hospitably, he has invited me into his home and offered to show me around town. In return, all he wants is a little exposure.

 The traffic gets nasty again. Singh, his pulsating carotid artery causing his beard to rise and fall, lays on the horn. "You've got to get in the game now," he says, peering at me through his thick lenses, "or you're gonna be left behind."


The annual income per person in India is still about Rs10,070, or less than $320. But since 1980, as Bangalore has become a high tech superpower at the heart of the Silicon Plateau (see "Bangalore," Wired 4.02, page 110), hundreds of millionaires - even a few billionaires - have been minted here. What's more, high tech has given thousands their first chance to buy into the middle-class life that's taken for granted in the United States.

Temples in Bangalore

Temples in Bangalore
1.Channakeshava Temple:

Bangalore Urban
Town: Anekal
Temple: Channakeshava Temple

Similar to all the other Southern states, Karnataka too has plenty of temples that tower over their towns and bring devotees and tourists in thousands every year into their vast spaces where they can worship and wonder.

Channakeshava Temple – Overview

The Channakeshava Temple in Anekal, Karnataka in the Bangalore Urban district is a magnificent example of the Vijayanagar style of temple architecture. The fact that the term ‘Anekal’ is a Tamil word meaning elephant (ane) and stone (kal), signifies the proximity of the temple to neighboring Tamil Nadu. It is situated about 915 meters above sea level, on an elephant shaped hill as the name indicates.

Channakeshava Temple – History

Though the name suggests some ancient history and excavations have brought up old bricks (indicative of a township that must have flourished at the site), there are no definite remains to prove that. The people in the region now are descendants of Chikka Thamma Gowda, belonging to the Sugatur family who settled there in 1603. Later the Mysore royal family annexed it to their kingdom before Hyder Ali added it to the Mysore district. It is currently managed by the Muzrai department of the Karnataka government.

Channakeshava Temple – Architecture

The architecture of the Channakeshava temple in Anekal is distinctly of the Vijayanagar style. It is a magnificent structure that faces that east, with the Mahadwara facing the south. Carvings of Lord Vishnu, accompanied by his two consorts decorate the niches in the outer walls.

There are four pillars in the navaranga which are ornately decorated with stories from the Bhagavada, the Ramayana, the Dasavatara etc from various puranas and ithihasas, depicting the stories of Vishwaroopa, Gajendramoksha, Yoga Narasimha, Varaha Matsya, Kalinganardana, Garuda, Hanuman, Kamadhenu, Kurma, Balarama, Vamana, Trivikrama and other avatars of Vishnu, and Vali and Sugriva in a fight.

The khumbas and kalasas of the outsides of the arthamandapa are done in high relief and are painted in bright colors.

Channakeshava Temple – Religious Significance

Although there’s very little archeological evidence, the temple is believed to be a very ancient and important structure. The ash mounds that once stood as a testament to some ancient thriving settlement were all apparently removed by the locals and used as fertilizers. It is quite reasonable to conclude that the temple structure has stood the test of time for more a few centuries. Along with the Kambada Ganesha Temple and the Bhramarambika Temple located in the vicinity, the Channakeshava Temple acts as a key site for devotees and believers.

Channakeshava Temple – Mythology

According to the Archaeological Society of Mysore, experts think that the original deity might have been consecrated by Arjuna, the Pandava king.

How To Get To Channakeshava Temple

The Channakeshava Temple in Anekal is in the Bangalore Urban district and is reachable from Bangalore city by car in about an hour. There are other picnic spots and places of interest around Anekal, including small waterfalls that make it worth the drive of about 40 kms.

Channakeshava Temple – Facts

The family that has been maintaining the temple for generations is in the process of renovating the temple premises and restoring it to its former glory.

Apart from the ash mounds, bricks were also picked from the site by the local inhabitants, making it harder to verify the temple’s historical value.

The temple has two large tanks, quite similar to the other Vijayanagar temples of its era.

The Anekal Channakeshava temple is definitely worth a visit if you are in Bangalore, as it is so close to the city, yet located in pristine countryside surrounded by natural scenic beauty.


2.Bheemalingeswara Temple:

District: Chikballapur
Town: Kaivara
Temple: Bheemalingeswara Temple

The Bheemalingeswara Temple is located in Kaivara, a small town in the Chikballapur district of Karnataka.

Bheemalingeswara Temple – Overview

The Bheemalingeswara temple is believed to have been built by Bheema, who was one of the Pandavas. Kaivara was known as Ekachakrapuram during the time of the Mahabharatha. It was here that the Pandavas spent a year in hiding after escaping the attempt of their lives at the house of lac. It was here too, that Bheema killed Bakasura, the demon who was terrifying the people of this region.

This place is also known for the famous poet Narayanappa, famous as Kaivara Thatayya. He was a proficient composer in both Kannada and Telugu. He composed Kirtanas in praise of Lord Vishnu who resides in the Amara Narayanaswami temple here. He is also famous for his prophetic work Kala Jnana about future events.

Bheemalingeswara Temple – Facts

There are several attractions in Kaivara, besides the Bheemalingeswara temple:

    The cave where Thatayya meditated
    The Thatayya Ashram
    The Amara Narayana temple
    The hillock where Bheema is said to have killed Bakasura
    A beautiful park maintained by the forest department

How to Get to Bheemalingeswara temple

Kaivara, where Bheemalingeswara temple is located, is about 70 km from Bangalore. You easily get buses from Bangalore city. You would have to get down at Kaivara cross and then proceed three kilometers inward to reach Kaivara town.

3.Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple:

District: Bangalore Rural
Town: Nandi Hills
Temple: Bhoga Nandeeshwara temple

Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple

The Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple is located in Nandi Hills Area, in Bangalore Rural district. It is a perfect weekend getaway for the city-weary people of Bangalore. The hills offer many places of interest amidst pristine forests, including the Nandi fort built by Tipu Sultan.

Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple – Overview

The Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple is situated in the village at the foothills of Nandi Hills. Nandi Hills is a popular temple site and picnic spot. The simple Yoga Nandeeshwara Temple on top of the hill is famous for the huge statue of the bull in front of the temple. Not many people know of the other Nandeeshwara temple, a magnificent, large complex housing not one, but three temples in all.

The original Bhoga Nandeeshwara temple was built in the 9th century. The first phase is believed to have been built by the Bana Queen Ratnavali. The temple then underwent many additions and modifications, spread over the rule of around five dynasties.

The hills are actually five hills which are the sources of five different rivers, namely Palar, Pinakini, Akravathy, Papagni and Swarnamukhi.

Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple – History

The Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple is a magnificent example of Dravidian Architecture. It is a 1000 year old temple that bears the architectural stamps of around five different dynasties that ruled here. Believed to have been originally constructed by the Bana Queen Ratnavali, this temple was added to and extended by the Ganga dynasty, Cholas, Hoysalas, Pallavas and finally the Vijayanagara kings. This temple even has a statue of the Chola King Rajendra.

Though the original Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple dedicated to Shiva and Parvati was built in the 9th century by the Banas, the Chola kings in the 11th century added the roof; the Hoysala dynasty added the marriage hall to the temple structure and the outer wall and buildings were added by the Vijayanagar kings in the 13th century. For centuries it was impregnable until the British stormed it in the October of 1791, and defeated Tipu Sultan.

Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple – Architecture

The temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati, is the oldest in the state of Karnataka. The Bhoga Nandeeshwara temple houses three temples, the Arunachaleshwara, the Uma Maheshwara and the Bhoga Nandeeshwara. Traditionally Arunachaleshwara is said to represent the childhood of Shiva, Bhoga Nandeeshwara the Youth, and Yoga Nandeeshwara on the Hill top, the final renunciation stage.

The Bhoga Nandeeshwara temple depicts the youthful phase of Lord Shiva, and as youth is the time to rejoice and enjoy life, there are many festivals held in this temple throughout the year.

The Uma Maheswara temple depicts the wedding scenes between Shiva and Parvati, and newly married couples often visit this temple to take the blessings of Shiva and Parvati.

The Yoga Narasimha temple located on the top of Nandi hills by contrast, has no festivals at all as it signifies Shiva in his renunciation stage. There are significant carvings in and around these temples.

This temple is a combination of the architectural styles mainly of the Gangas, Cholas, Hoysalas and the Vijayanagara rulers.

The Arunachaleshwara Temple

The Arunachaleshwara temple, built by the Gangas, has a unique form of Lord Ganesha called Simha Ganapathi or Ugra Ganapathi. In front of this temple is a Nandi idol made of granite.

Uma Maheshwara Temple

Built by the Hoysalas, this temple has the presiding deities of Uma and Maheshwara in the Sanctum. The Kalyana Mandapa is surrounded by four pillars each of which have a divine couple depicted on them – Shiva and Parvati, Brahma and Saraswathi, Vishnu and Lakshmi and Agni Deva and Swaha Devi.

The pillars and walls are covered with intricate carvings typical of the Hoysalas. The structures are covered in figures of parrots, animals, creepers and divine figures.

The Bhoga Nandeeshwara

The main temple, the Bhoga Nandeeshwara has a majestic Shiva Linga in the Sanctum. This temple is said to have been built by the Cholas. There is a figure of a Chola King in this temple, believed to be of Rajendra Chola. The pillars are covered in beautiful carvings. The Nandi Idol in front of the Sanctum in this temple is even more attractive than the one in front of the Arunachaleshwara Temple

There are two additions to this temple built by the Vijayanagara rulers – the Kalyana Mandapa and the Tulabhara Mandapa.

Shringi Theertha

Shringi Theertha is the temple pond. It is surrounded on all four sides by a walkway and a running mandapa. This pond has steps leading down to it on all four sides. Legend has it that this pond was created by the divine Bull Nandi plunging his horn into the ground to draw out water from the divine Ganga. This pond is held to be the source of the South Pinakini (South Pennar) River.

How to Reach Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple

Nandi Hills is a very famous tourist spot. Frequent bus services will be available from the city of Bangalore, 60 km away. Bhoga Nandeeshwara Temple is located in the village at the foothills of Nandi Hills. You can reach here from Nandi Hills by auto rickshaw. The best time to visit the Bhoga Nandeeshwara temple is during Shivaratri.


4.Chamarajashwara Temple, Chamarajanagar

District: Chamarajanagar
Town: Chamarajanagar
Temple: Chamarajashwara Temple

One of the ancient and historical temples, the Chamarajashwara Temple is regarded as a very important seat of Hinduism in the country. Every year, thousands of pilgrims throng to this place to seek the blessings of Lord Shiva.

Chamarajashwara Temple – Overview

The famous Chamarajashwara Temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. The priest here chants hymns of Bhilvastakam in praise of the mighty Lord. The temple has been built in an area of 232×195 square feet in the town of Chamarajanagar in Karnataka.

Chamarajashwara Temple – History

Built in 1826 A.D. by Mummadi Krishna Raja Wodeyar, the town was originally known as Arikotara (Ari means foe and Kotara means axe). This temple was built in the memory of Shri Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar, the father of Mummadi Krishna Raja Wodeyar.

The temple was later renamed as Chamarajashwara Temple after Shri Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar of the Mysore Dynasty was born in the year 1776. A stone carved inscription resting in front of the Janana Mandap in near the Chamarajashwara Temple gives this historical information. The Chamarajashwara Temple shot to fame during the reign of Mummadi Krishna Raja Wodeyar.

Chamarajashwara Temple – Architecture

The Chamarajashwara Temple is a wonderful example of Hoysala architecture. This temple has a five storey Rajagopuram which is more than 70 feet high. The Rajagopuram has five brass Kalashas and all of them face eastwards. In front of the temple, on both sides, is a big stage wherein cultural programs are conducted during special occasions.

The Chamarajashwara temple is famous for its stucco coloured images and paintings adapted from Mythological events like Samudra Manthan (churning the sea for Amrit), Kempananjambha shrine, Girija Kalyana and Chamundeshwari. Palace artists hailing from Somavamsha Dynasty used to maintain the images according to the Mysore style. These paintings are coloured in red, yellow and blue. A mixture of diamond and gum has been used after crushing the stones. Stucco coloured images are famous relics of the Mysore Dynasty and can be seen in many temples built during this era. Sadly, most of these paintings are in a bad condition and only a few of them have managed to retain the softness and delicacy which is easily detected by art lovers.

Chamarajashwara Temple – Carvings

The temple has a sanctum sanctorum or a garba griha, an open pillared hall or a muukha mandapa and a Nandi mandapa. These mandapas have carved images of gods and goddesses.

The temple entrance has an idol of Nandi the Bull. This idol faces the idol of Lord Shiva. The idol of Lord Shiva has an iron shield and is made of concrete. The main temple has sixty four idols and other ancient gods and goddesses.

God Snapana Ganapathi at Navarang (along with six lingas) is also housed in the sanctum of the Shiva temple. Installed in front of the Shiva temple, is the Navagraha or the representatives of nine planets. Most devotees visit this temple and pray to the Navagraha during Amavasya.

Lord Shiva was originally adorned with valuable jewels which were presented by the three wives of Mummadi Wodeyar. Now these ornaments are kept in the treasury. Lord Shiva is decorated with these ornaments only during the Girija Kalyana celebration. The temple inscriptions suggest that the idols have been brought from another temple, Balamuri in Srirangapatnam.

The Chamarajashwara Temple – Rituals and Festivals

Special pujas are held during the festivals of Girijakalyana and Shivaratri. The Chamarajashwara Rathayatra attracts a plethora of pilgrims during the month of July every year. The chariot fest conducted during the Chamarajashwara Rathayatra made this a famous event. The main Chamarajashwara Ratha is 167 years old. Basavaraje Urs of Urs Dynasty built the main Rath during his service in the Mysore Wodeyar Palace in 1835 as a bhakshi.

How to Get to the Chamarajashwara Temple

The best way to reach the temple town of Chamarajanagar is by road. This is well connected by buses and is 185 kms from Bangalore.

This temple is an architectural beauty and should be visited not only by pilgrims but also by art lovers.


5.Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore

The picturesque city of Bangalore is quite well known and famous for its monuments, temples and other tourist places. There are many temples in Bangalore which are extremely old but have not lost their charm. This cave temple is located near Basavanagudi. The Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple in Bangalore in India is famous for its architecture and also a rare phenomenon. This temple is one of the oldest temples in Bangalore.

History
Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore was built by the great Kempe Gowda, who was the founder of Bangalore. The type of construction that was followed while building the picturesque Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore was the 'Ancient' type of building temples.


Description:

On the festival of Sankranti (a local festival), a phenomenon takes place which is a scientific mavel. It speaks of the deep understanding that our forefathers had of the mysteries of the universe and fundamental laws which govern our life. The idols of Nandi and Lord Shiva are so positioned that the sun's rays, passing between the horns of Nandi, light up the face of Lord Shiva. Every year generally on the 14th or 15th of January this rare phenomenon takes place. This phenomenon is a huge crowd puller and attracts a large number of devotees. Every year thousands of tourists from each and every corner of the world and from all over India visit this beautiful and picturesque temple.

Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore is a natural monolith carved cave temple and the temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. Dedicated to Lord Gangadeshwara and Goddess Honnadevi (i.e., Lord Shiva and Parvati), are two well known shrines. Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple consists of thirty three idols.

Indianholiday.com provides detailed, elaborate and in depth information on the Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore and about other Temples in Bangalore. Indianholiday.com also provides for Online booking facility for a tour to Karnataka. For more extensive information on the Gavi Gangadeshwara Temple Bangalore and about Temples in Karnataka, please keep browsing through the pages of this site. So to book a tour or to clarify any queries, please fill up the form.

6.Gaurishwara Temple, Yelandur

District: Chamarajanagar
Town: Yelandur
Temple: Gaurishwara Temple

Gaurishwara Temple is located in the Yelandur Taluq in Chamarajanagar district, Karnataka.

Gaurishwara Temple – Overview

Yelandur was a prominent town during the Chola Rule in Karnataka. The Gaurishwara Temple is a major pilgrim and tourist attraction here.

Gaurishwara Temple – History

The Gaurishwara Temple was built by a feudatory of the Cholas, Singadepa, who ruled this region in the sixteenth century. Devabhupala, as Singadepa was known, built this beautiful temple in 1550 AD. Somehow, this temple was not maintained well and was allowed to get into a dilapidated state within a period of 100 years. But in 1654-55, it was rebuilt by Devabhupala’s grandson Mudhabhupa.

Gaurishwara Temple – Architecture

The Gaurishwara Temple was built in the Dravidian style, though it does not have the distinctive Gopura or entrance tower that marks this style. The temple also has beautiful carvings on pillars and walls depicting scenes from mythology. There are carvings of Andhakasuravadha, figures of Narasimha, Sarabha, Dhakshinamurthy, Vali, Sugriva and Kalinga Mardhana Krishna.

It also has the beautiful Stone Chains that mark the Chola temples of this region. Beautiful rings carved out of stone, with no joints, hang down from the corners of the entrance. These rings look like bangles, so the Mahadhwara is known as ‘Bale Mandapa’. Bale means bangles in Kannada.

How to Get to Gaurishwara Temple

Yelandur lies at a distance of 155 km from Bangalore. Bus services can be availed from Bangalore, Mysore and other places.

7.Ghati Sri Subramanya Temple, Doddaballapura

District: Bangalore Rural
Town: Doddaballapura
Temple: Sri Subramanya Temple

Ghati Sri Subramanya Temple is one of the most popular temples amongst the hundreds that are scattered in and around Bangalore. People flock in thousands to this temple and the presiding deity, Sri Subramanya, is particularly popular with the Tamilian population of Karnataka. It is located near Doddaballapur in Bangalore Rural district, about 60 km away from Bangalore city, serving as a perfect getaway for the weekend.

Sri Subramanya Temple – Overview

It is an ancient temple, built in Dravidian tradition, similar to many other temples around Bangalore and Mysore, including the Nanjundeshwara temple in Nanjangud, and the famous Chamundeswari temple atop the Chamundi hills. As it is a fairly old temple, with the presiding deities of both Lord Subramanya and Lord Lakshmi Narasimha, it attracts the devotees of both deities. Though the only place of interest in Ghati is the temple, there are plenty of other attractions within 20–30 km of the temple, and these can keep you occupied during your weekend getaway.

Sri Subramanya Temple – Architecture

As specified above, the style of architecture in this temple is Dravidian. No one knows how long the idols have stood there for, but the Sri Subramanya Temple is believed to be an ancient one. The idol of the Lord is said to be swayambhu, meaning self-originated and not created or sculpted by anyone else. A unique aspect about the temple is that while the sculpture of the Lord Subramanya is positioned towards the East, Lord Lakshmi Narasimha stands at the back of the same idol, facing the West. The devotees obtain a darshan of Lord Lakshmi Narasimha by way of a strategically placed mirror. The temple is particularly special for those who seek the Lord to bless them with a child.

Sri Subramanya Temple – Religious Significance

The Pushya Suddha Shasti is one of the biggest festivals in this temple as this day is believed to be the birthday of Lord Subramanya. The other major festival in the temple is Narasimha Jayanthi. Skanda Shasti is also celebrated with a lot of fanfare as it is a special day for Lord Subramanya and Panghuni Uttiram, the wedding anniversary of the Lord, is also celebrated. Vaikashi Vishakam is another special day to the presiding deity here. It is believed by the locals that the Lord is benevolent in his blessings to those who come seeking his blessings to find a compatible partner or to have a child.

How To Get To Sri Subramanya Temple

It is situated about 60 kms from Bangalore city on the Doddaballapur road, about 12 km after crossing Doddaballapur. The nearest railway station is Makali Durga on the Bangalore – Guntakal line. The temple provides free lunch to everyone who partakes in its ‘Nithya Annadhana’ scheme as do most temples in the South. There are many other temples and places of interest pretty close to the temple, in and around Doddaballapur.

Sri Subramanya Temple – Facts

People offer their prayers to a snake mound that is present outside the temple

Milk is also regularly poured into the snake mound so as to appease the Gods

Snakes carved onto stones, also termed as Nagappa, can be seen under a huge Peepal tree and devotees pray for any favors they need at this spot

A multi hooded snake’s silver idol can also be seen near the chief deity

Even if you are not a very devout or religious person, the temple is worth a visit for its beautiful architecture and historical significance, the surrounding country side and other tourist attractions.

8.Sri Kabbalamma Temple

District: Ramanagara
Town: Kabbalu
Temple: Sri Kabbalamma Temple

Sri Kabbalamma Temple

Sri Kabbalamma temple is located in the Kabbal village in the Kanakapura Taluk of Ramanagara district. The Kabbal village is also home to the fort of Kabbal. This fort is built on a monolithic rock 250m high with steep surfaces on three sides and less steep surfaces on the fourth side.

Sri Kabbalamma Temple – Overview

The temple is believed to be the only shrine for nearly 28 villages in the surrounding region. According to people nearby, the goddess is very powerful and is believed to fulfill all her devotees’ wishes.

Sri Kabbalamma Temple – Religious Significance

The presiding deity of this temple is Goddess Kabbalamma. The village, fort and hillock are named after this temple. Durga in Kannada means fort, hence the name Kabbal Durga has been given to this hill. There are many stories and traditions associated with this temple. Basaveshwara, the bull living in the temple premises is believed to play a role in blessing devotees. When a devotee promises to offer something to the bull, he is asked to sleep over the floor and the bull is allowed to walk over him. This is one custom followed in the temple. Sometimes small children are also allowed to lie down in front of the bull. The devotees offer a bundle of currency notes to thank the Basava for fulfilling their wishes. These notes are tied up to the bull’s horns.

How to Get to Sri Kabbalamma Temple

Kabbal Durga is located around 75 km from the city of Bangalore, 15 km from Kanakapura and 22 km away from Channapatna. This place can be reached by road.

By Bus: Take a bus to reach Kanakapura/Ramnagara/Channapattna and from here a bus to Sathnur. Sathnur is located on the way to Kollegal/Malavalli from Bangalore. It is preferred to travel from Kanakapura and from there taking a bus to Sathnur or Kabbalu, since Kabbulu village is near Sathnur. The frequency of state government buses is low but many private buses ply along this route.

By road: You can reach Kabbal by taking the NH209 Kanakapura Road which goes directly to Kanakapura. From here take the road which goes to Kollegal/Malavalli. Once you reach a board around 7 km from Kanakapura, take the right. After reaching the Channapattana-Sathnur road, take left.

Sri Kabbalamma Temple – Facts

Kabbal Durga hill is ideal place for trekking and climbing enthusiasts.

    The nearest hospital to the village is Sathnur.
    The petrol bunk is located at Kanakapura.

The hill is usually less crowded but people regularly visit the temple on the top. The temple authorities are planning to build another temple; people who wish to donate any money for the construction can contact them. October to February is the best time to visit this temple.

9.Muthyala Madugu, Anekal

District: Bangalore
Town: Anekal
Temple: Shiva Temple

muthyala-madugu-anekalMuthyala Madugu or Muthyala Maduvu is a picnic spot located a few kilometers away from Bangalore. It is a small water fall and you can reach the place through Hosur Road or Bannerghetta Road. Muthyala Madugu is located in Anekal, a small town present in the outskirts of Bangalore city.

Muthyala Madugu – Overview

Muthyala Maduvu or the Pearl Valley (as it is known among tourists), is a beautiful getaway for a short picnic. Muthyala Maduvu literally means ‘Pearl Pool’. The waterfall here is small but it lives up to its name, falling down in pearly rivulets.

It is a nice place to visit and an ideal getaway spot that you can head to escape from the buzz and pollution of the city. It is a scenic spot and there is a small Shiva temple here, called Muthyala Ishvara temple. The shrine has a Shiva Linga, and regular pujas are performed here.

Muthyala Madugu – Facts

The highlight of any visit to Muthyala Madugu is of course, the water fall.

It is a 300 foot waterfall

The source of the water is the Onakanahalli Tank

It is a pearly cascade of water, falling in thin rivulets in off seasons

During and after the rainy season, the waterfall grows is size, and the pool at the base becomes big enough to swim in

The steps leading up to the waterfall make a beautiful setting, the lovely scenery will serve to take your mind away from the steep climb

There is a trail around the waterfall, for those who are interested in hiking

There is a small but attractive Shiva temple here, where regular pujas are performed, so it is also good for a combined religious visit

The best time to visit would be during the rainy season, though you should avoid visiting during heavy rains

The waterfall and the surrounding trail can be dangerous during a downpour

How to Get to Muthyala Madugu

Important bus routes are connected to Anekal. If you are coming in a car, depending on where you are, take the Hosur road or Bannerghetta road.


10.Sri Shanimahathma Temple, Madhure

District: Bangalore
Town: Madhure
Temple: Sri Shanimahathma Temple

sri-shanimahathma-temple-madhureSri Shanimahathma temple is located a few kilometers away from Bangalore city near Nelamangala town. It is a temple dedicated to Lord Shanishwara, one of the planets in Hindu Astrology.

Sri Shanimahathma Temple – Overview

Shani or Shanishwara is one of the nine planets in Hindu astrology. Shanishwara is an embodiment of Saturn. He is the son of Suryadeva and his second wife Chaya Devi. He is one of the most feared and revered astrological deities.

Sri Shanimahathma Temple – Religious Significance

He is a strict Deva who metes out the punishment he has been ordained to give with severity. Yet, He also blesses with generosity. Shanishwara’s negative influence on one’s natal chart is one of the most feared beliefs in India. People flock to temples to worship Shanishwara, in order to lessen the ill effects of his influence. There are many temples for Shanishwara, one of the most famous being the temple at Thirunallar in Tamilnadu.

Sri Shanimahathma Temple – Facts

Bangalore has a few Shanishwara temples too. The Sri Shanimahathma Temple at Chikka Madure is considered to be one of the oldest. This temple is located on the banks of Madhure Kere, a big lake. This temple is constructed in the South Indian style, with a Gopura.

The annual festivals in which an idol of Shanishwara is taken out on a procession on a chariot attract a lot of devotees. People come to this temple to pray to Lord Shanimahayhma and to offer Ellu Batti– black sesame seeds tied up in a piece of cloth and soaked in gingelly oil. This offering is believed to please Lord Shanishwara.

How to Get To Sri Shanimahathma Temple

If you plan to travel by bus, take a Bangalore Metro bus to Nelamangala. From Nelamangala, you should catch another bus to take you to Madhure, on Doddabellapore road. If you are planning to use a car, take the Bangalore – Pune highway till you reach Nelamangala. From Nelamangala take the road to Doddabellapore.

11.Venugopalaswamy Temple, Devanahalli

District: Bangalore Rural
Town: Devanahalli
Temple: The Venugopalaswamy Temple

Devanahalli, a suburb, featured in the news a lot after it was announced by the government that the new and improved Bangalore International Airport would be coming up there. The name literally means ‘the abode of gods’ and has plenty of temples to its name, including the Venugopalaswamy temple in the Bangalore rural area.

Venugopalaswamy Temple – Overview

The fort in Devanahalli housed the erstwhile rulers of Mysore like Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan. The fort surrounding the township has numerous temples within its walls, like the Nanjundeswara temple, Chamundeswara temple, Veerabhadraswamy temple and the Ranganathaswamy temple. The temples in Devanahalli were built in different eras but mostly are of the Hoysala architecture.

Venugopalaswamy Temple – History

Though the scale of the temple is small, its size doesn’t detract people from marveling at the architectural intricacies of the temple with its pillars and frescoes decorated in the Hoysala tradition. It is a miniature version of the mega complexes that the temples in Belur and Halebid are, and is as detailed as the other two in its carvings and statues. There are two statues of Lord Vishnu at the sides of the gopuram which are believed to be of the Ganga era.

Venugopalaswamy Temple – Architecture

Though the temple is relatively small, the Rayagopuram is tall with the two statues of Lord Vishnu on both sides carrying distinctly different tools and weapons and with different expressions that provide a startling contrast. The temple, despite its size has a spacious inner Prakara and also has a navaranga, mukhamantapa and a typically small garbhagriha.

The Prakara has niches adorned with intricate stucco work that are very popular with tourists and a must see to any visitor. The mukhamantapa’s pillars are beautifully decorated with intricate carvings. The outer walls of the temple, made of stone, are cover in frieze, depicting various scenes from the Ramayana. The northern and southern walls narrate the entire Balakandam.

Venugopalaswamy Temple – Religious Significance

The temple’s presiding deity Lord Venugopalaswamy is present in a standing posture as opposed to his reclining posture; the deity is in styled in the Vijayanagar tradition while the shikara is in Dravidian style, standing testament to the amalgamation of the two chief cultures in these parts.

Every April there is a temple festival called an Utsav, on the Chaitra Poornima day; for this festival the entire temple is cleaned and washed, which has led to some damage to the frescos. Such cleaning and maintenance are funded by the collections in the temple itself, where donations are offered by the devotees.

How To Get To Venugopalaswamy Temple

The temple is on the Bellary road on NH – 7; once you cross the city limits, the temple town of Devanahalli will about 30 km away; and the temple will be one of the first buildings that you will see on your right when driving from Bangalore.

Thanks to its increased connectivity to the main city of Bangalore, the temple can be easily reached. The onus is on the government to improve the temple’s tourist visibility and maintain the facilities to attract tourists to this beautiful temple.

12.Vishwa Shanti Ashram, Arishinakunte

District: Bangalore
Town: Arishinakunte
Temple: Vishwa Shanti Ashram

Vishwa Shanti Ashram is a spiritual center near Bangalore. It is located on the Bangalore Tumkur highway, in Arishinakunte village in Nelamangala Taluk. It is located at a distance of around 25 km from Bangalore city.
Vishwa Shanti Ashram – Overview

Vishwa Shanti Ashram is a wonderful but little known temple complex located in the fringes of Bangalore city. The complex, spread over nearly 20 acres of land, has a number of beautiful temples and a park. There is a huge Vijaya Vittala statue at the entrance and inside there are the Ashtalakshmi temple, Gayathri Mandir, meditation hall with Bhagavad Gita Bodana and Vishwaroopa statues.
Vishwa Shanti Ashram – History

Vishwa Shanti Ashram was established by Sant Keshavadas, whose organization is known as the Temple of Comic Religion in the west. Sant Keshavadas was born in 1934 in Bhadragiri, a small village in Karnataka. A law Graduate from the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial College, his life quest was more spiritual than material.

He believed in the unity of all religions, that they sought the same Ultimate Truth. He unified the teachings of all world religions and established the Temple of Cosmic Religion. He wrote 50 books and has composed 6000 kirtans. He travelled all over the world spreading his message of a Universal Religion. After his passing in 1997, his spiritual work is carried on by his wife and successor, Guru Mataji.

The beautiful Vishwa Shanti Ashram is the Headquarters of the Temple of Cosmic Religion. It was constructed with funds from donations from the followers of Sadguru Sant Keshavadas. The highlight of the ashram is the striking Bhagavad Gita Mandir.
Vishwa Shanti Ashram – Architecture

The Ashram is spread over a few acres of land. Inside, at the front, there is the huge Vijaya Vittala statue. Below this statue is the Lakshmi Narayana temple. Spread on either side of this temple is the Ashtalakshmi Mandir, with the eight forms of Mahalakshmi. Further on there are temples for Gayathri Devi, Navagrahas and Santhoshi Mata.

At the center is the Bhagavad Gita Mandir. To the right of this Mandir lie a series of statues representing the seven main holy rivers of India – Ganga, Yamuna, Saraswathi, Godavari, Narmada, Sindhu, and Kaveri.

The Bhagavad Gita temple itself is constructed in the form of a chariot, with Arjuna seated at the back, and Krishna, holding the reins of the horses, teaching him the lofty yet practical philosophy of the Bhagavad Gita. Inside this chariot is a meditation hall with a large statue of Vishwaroopa Narayana, with the encompassing the ten avatars of Lord Vishnu.
How to Get to Vishwa Shanti Ashram

Vishwa Shanti Ashram is located on the Bangalore-Tumkur highway. It is in the Bangalore Metro bus route to Nelamangala from the city. Get down at Arishinakunte stop. From there you’ll have to walk for one kilometer to reach the temple.
Incranations of Vishwa Shanti Ashram

The 10 incarnations at the ashram you will see are as follow,

    1.Matsya (the fish)
    2.Koorma (the tortoise)
    3.Varaha (the boar)
    4.Narasimha (the human-lion)
    5.Vamana (the dwarf)
    6.Parasurama (the angry man, Rama with an axe)
    7.Lord Rama (the perfect man, King of Ayodha)
    8.Lord Krishna (the divine statesman)
    9.Balarama (elder brother of Krishna)
    10.Kalki (the mighty worrior)

Vishwa Shanti Ashram – Facts

Vishwa Shanti Ashram serves as the headquarters of the Temple of Cosmic Religion.

The inside and outside walls of the chariot are set with granite stones bearing inscriptions of the 800 verses of Bhagavad Gita in Sanskrit, English, Hindi and Kannada

There is a total fee of INR 12 to visit the Ashram

At the entrance, you have to pay INR 2 for leaving your shoes

Inside, to proceed towards the Gita Mandir, you have to pay INR 10 per head.

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Landmark: Opposite Gitanjali Jewellery
Contact Person: Yesther Bhagya
Address: Shop No. 446/19, 2nd Floor  Sri Shankara Arcade  , 27th Cross
Jaya Nagar 4th Block, Bangalore -560011
Area: Jaya Nagar 4th Block
Website: www.aptech-education.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9 AM - 6 PM

Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Microsoft Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Tools Training, Web Technologies Training


10.Bestfaculty.com, Shivaji Nagar, Bangalore

Mobile: 8978397610
Contact Person: Rakesh
Address: Shivaji Nagar, Bangalore -560001
Area: Shivaji Nagar
Email: bestfaculty.com@gmail.com
Website: www.bestfaculty.com
Working Hours: All days: 24 hours

Software Development, Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Computer Networking Training, Content Management Software Training, Database Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Middleware Training, Mobile Training Courses, Multimedia & Design Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

11.C.B.M. Publication, J.C. Nagar, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 41145744, 080 - 41146233
Landmark: Opposite Canara Bank
Address: Unity Building
J.C. Nagar, Bangalore -560002
Area: J.C. Nagar

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Hardware Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

12.Computer Point Education, Malleswaram, Bangalore

Address;

Phone: 080 - 23465277
Mobile: 9886291319
Landmark: Beside RV Lab
Contact Person: Nandish
Address: Plot No. 8/1, 1st Floor, 10th Cross  Malleswaram, Bangalore -560003
Area: Malleswaram
Email: nadish400@yahoo.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9 AM - 9 PM

Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Hardware Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

13.Computer World Education, H.A.L., Bangalore

Address:

Mobile: 9880306153
Landmark: Opposite Doddanekundi Cross
Contact Person: Bhageerathi
Address: #59, 2nd Floor,  HAL Marthahalli, Varthu Main Road
H.A.L., Bangalore -560037
Area: H.A.L.
Email: bha_compuworld@rediffmail.com
Working Hours: All Days: 5:00 am - 11:00 pm

Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Tools Training, Web Technologies Training


14.STG ( Software Technology Group International Limited ) , Koramangala 7th Block , Bangalore

Address:

Computer Education & Training Centre

Phone: (080)  67947339

Address:   304, Money Centre, 4th Floor, Koramangala 7th Block, Bangalore- 560034, Karnataka

Landmark:  Above Pizza Corner


15.NIIT Bommanahalli Centre , Bommana Halli , Bangalore

Address:

Computer Education & Training Centre

Phone: (080)  67947224

Address:   395, Ganapa Arcade, 2nd Floor, 29th Cross, 9th Main, Mangammapalaya Main Road, Sector-7, Bommana Halli, Bangalore- 560068, Karnataka

Landmark:  Near Mangammapalaya Bus Stop

16.NVIT Technology , R.T Nagar , Bangalore

Address:

Computer Education & Training Centre

Phone: (080)  67947181

Address:   5, 5th Cross, 5th Main, Ganganagar, R.T Nagar, Bangalore- 560045, Karnataka

Landmark:  Opposite Modern Public School


16.Diginet Online India Pvt. Ltd., Wilson Garden, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 22276049, 080 - 22221445, 080 - 22221446
Mobile: 9945823663, 9341252729
Landmark: Near Canara Bank
Contact Person: Geeta
Address: No. 213/60, 1st Floor, 11th Cross  Wilson Garden, Bangalore -560027
Area: Wilson Garden
Email: info@diginetonline.com
Website: www.diginetonline.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9.30 AM - 8.30 PM

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Hardware Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

17.Dual Core Technologies, Koramangala, Bangalore

Phone: 080 - 30228845
Mobile: 8792118724, 9535275431
Landmark: Near Koramangala Club
Contact Person: Shankar
Address: Kudeer Arcade  , 17th A Main, 6th Block
Koramangala, Bangalore -560095
Area: Koramangala
Email: basis.be@gmail.com
Website: www.dualcoretech.com
Working Hours: Monday – Saturday: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

18.Elsoft Technologies Pvt. Ltd., Jayanagar, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 25748120
Mobile: 9886474828
Landmark: Near Advaita Petrol Bunk
Contact Person: Hari Kumar
Address: No. 82, 30th Cross, 4th Block,  Jayanagar, Bangalore -560071
Area: Jayanagar
Email: harish@elsofttech.com
Website: www.elsoftech.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 8:30 am - 8:30 pm

Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Computer Networking Training, Content Management Software Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Middleware Training, Mobile Training Courses, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Architecture Training, Software Tools Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

19.I.C.E Academy, Madivala, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 32955636, 080 - 65985035
Mobile: 9242195067
Landmark: Opposite Kaveri Nursing Home
Contact Person: Vijay
Address: No. 3/6-4, 2nd Floor  Hosur Main Road
Madivala, Bangalore -560068
Area: Madivala
Working Hours: Monday - Sunday: 9.30 AM - 8.30 PM

Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Content Management Software Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Programming Languages Training, Web Technologies Training

20.Ideaon Think, J.P. Nagar 2nd Phase, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 40939211
Mobile: 9008005566
Contact Person: Nagesh
Address: #74&75, 2nd Floor,  23rd Main, 3rd Cross
J.P. Nagar 2nd Phase, Bangalore -560078
Area: J.P. Nagar 2nd Phase
Email: info@ideaonthink.com
Website: www.ideaonthink.com
Working Hours: All days: 7:00 am - 9:00 pm

Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Ethical Hacking Training, Microsoft Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training

21.IIHT - Ganganagar, Ganga Nagar, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 42146146
Mobile: 9886784627, 9060820011
Contact Person: Shivakumar
Address: No. 324, Bellary Road  Ganga Nagar, Bangalore -560032
Area: Ganga Nagar
Email: shivuputta@gmail.com
Working Hours: All days: 9:00 am - 11:00 pm

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Microsoft Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Software Tools Training

22.Indian Institute of Network Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Mathikere, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 41221234, 080 - 41114449
Mobile: 9019797123
Landmark: Near Mathikere Bus Stop
Contact Person: Surendra
Address: No. 2, 1st Floor  SLNA Complex
Mathikere, Bangalore -560054
Area: Mathikere
Email: info@iins.co.in
Website: www.iins.co.in
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9 AM - 8.30 PM

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Microsoft Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training

23.Jetking Learning Center, BSK 3rd Stage, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 22447082, 080 - 26656737
Mobile: 9686473004
Landmark: Behind HDFC Bank
Contact Person: Manjunath
Address: No. 5, 3rd Floor, Kathriguppe Circle, 100 Feet Ring Road  Nanjaiah Complex
BSK 3rd Stage, Bangalore -560085
Area: BSK 3rd Stage
Email: bvn@jetkinginfotrain.com
Website: www.jetkingjayanagar.com
Working Hours: All Days: 8:00 am - 9:00 pm

Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Microsoft Training, Operating System Training


24.Jetking Learning Center, Jaya Nagar 3rd Block, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 22447082, 080 - 26656737
Mobile: 9980266721, 9886286711
Landmark: Opposite ICICI Bank
Contact Person: Vinitha
Address: Plot No. 174/40, Shop No. 401, 4th Floor  Lucky Paradise  , 8th F Main, 22nd Cross, 4th Cross, Lucky Gardens
Jaya Nagar 3rd Block, Bangalore -560011
Area: Jaya Nagar 3rd Block
Email: jyn@jetkinginfotrain.com
Website: www.jetkinginfotrain.com
Working Hours: Monday - Sunday: 9.30 AM - 8.30 PM

Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Microsoft Training, Operating System Training

25.Joinus Info Services India Pvt. Ltd., Hebbal, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 32497522
Landmark: Near M.K. Ahmed Mart
Address: No. 21  15th A Cross, Bhuvaneswari Nagar, Kempapura
Hebbal, Bangalore -560024
Area: Hebbal
Website: www.joinusindia.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9.30 AM - 6 PM

Certification Courses Training, Content Management Software Training, Database Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Programming Languages Training, Web Technologies Training

26.Karrox Technologies Ltd., Jaya Nagar 4th Block, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 022 - 32207522
Mobile: 9987550607
Contact Person: Padma
Address: 34th Cross, 10th Main Road
Jaya Nagar 4th Block, Bangalore -560041
Area: Jaya Nagar 4th Block
Email: enquiry@talentedge.in
Website: www.karROX.com
Working Hours: Monday - Friday: 9:30 am - 6:30 pm( Lunch: 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm )

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Mobile Training Courses, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Tools Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

27.Koenig Solutions Ltd., Koramangala, Bangalore

Address:

Mobile: 9958753322
Landmark: Opposite Shanti Sagar Hotel
Address: No. 47  4th Block, 100 Feet Road
Koramangala, Bangalore -560034
Area: Koramangala
Website: www.koenig-solutions.com

Business Intelligence Training, Computer Networking Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training

28.Manipal Institute of Computer Education, Wilson Garden, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 22221445
Mobile: 7795181398
Landmark: Near Canara Bank
Contact Person: Geetha
Address: 11th Cross
Wilson Garden, Bangalore -560027
Area: Wilson Garden
Email: sulekha@diginetonline.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Hardware Training, Microsoft Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Software Tools Training, Web Technologies Training


29.Reach IT India Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore City H.O, Bangalore

Address:

Mobile: 9959224497
Contact Person: Anil N.M.
Address: Bangalore City H.O, Bangalore -560001
Area: Bangalore City H.O
Email: reachithelpdesk@gmail.com
Website: www.reachitindia.com
Working Hours: All days: 24 hours

Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Content Management Software Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, Ethical Hacking Training, Hardware Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Middleware Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Project Management Certification Training, Software Tools Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

30.S.S. Infotech, Yelankha New Town, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 41128174
Mobile: 9449671250
Landmark: Opposite Citi Bank ATM, Above Wizz Photo Studion
Contact Person: Chavan
Address: #2341, 2nd Floor,  16th B Cross, 3rd Phase Bus Stand Main Road
Yelankha New Town, Bangalore -560106
Area: Yelankha New Town
Email: ssinfotechmails@gmail.com
Working Hours: All days: 24 hours

Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Database Training, Enterprise Training, Hardware Training, Microsoft Training, Mobile Training Courses, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Programming Languages Training, Project Management Certification Training, Software Architecture Training, Software Tools Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training


31.Sancentre, Jaya Nagar 3rd Block, Bangalore

Address:

Mobile: 9611836161
Landmark: Opposite Stadium
Contact Person: Suriya
Address: #8, 2nd Floor,  East Byrasandra Main Road
Jaya Nagar 3rd Block, Bangalore -560011
Area: Jaya Nagar 3rd Block
Email: info@sancentre.com
Website: www.sancentre.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Administration Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Operating System Training, Programming Languages Training

32.Trijit Technologies Pvt. Ltd., Yelankha New Town, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 32919413
Landmark: Near Seshadripuram College
Address: No. 667  5th A Main, A Sector
Yelankha New Town, Bangalore -560064
Area: Yelankha New Town
Email: info@trijit.com
Website: www.trijit.com
Working Hours: Monday - Sunday: 8 AM - 5 PM

Administration Training, Content Management Software Training, Enterprise Training, Microsoft Training, Web Technologies Training

33.Sure Success, Brookefields, Bangalore

Address:

Phone: 080 - 42274295
Mobile: 8105820111
Landmark: Near HDFC Bank
Contact Person: Anha Goel
Address: Old #9, #8/2, 3rd Floor,  Hyper City Mall, Brook Field Main Road
Brookefields, Bangalore -560037
Area: Brookefields
Email: service@getsuresuccess.com
Website: www.getsuresuccess.com
Working Hours: All days: 9:00 am - 8:00 pm

Administration Training, Business Intelligence Training, Certification Courses Training, Computer Networking Training, Content Management Software Training, Database Training, Engineering Design Training, Enterprise Training, MainFrame Training, Microsoft Training, Middleware Training, Multimedia & Design Training, Networking & Cisco Training, Operating System Training, Oracle Training, Programming Languages Training, Project Management Certification Training, Robotics Training, Software Tools Training, Software Testing Training, Web Technologies Training

34.CLOUD SOFT SOLUTIONS

Address:

#92/5, A.C.R Greens,Outer Ring Road, Marathalli

opp to Innovative Multiplex,Home Town

Location : Marathahalli - Bangalore

Postal Code : 560037

Phone :9880795734

Mobile : 9916224915

Website : http://www.cloudsoftsol.com

Landmark : Next To Bhagini Restaurant,


Cloud Soft Solutions is Leading Training Provider offers a comprehensive portfolio of technical training and education services designed for individuals, companies, and public organizations to acquire, maintain and optimize their IT skills.

35.Reboot Mind IT Solutions Pvt. Ltd.

Address : No: 537, 2nd Floor, Robby Arcade,

C.M.H Road, Indira Nagar

Location : Indira Nagar - Bangalore

Postal Code : 560038

Phone :+91-80-40920631

Mobile : +91 9845127857

Website : www.rebootmindedu.com

Landmark : Opp. Metro Station. Above Coffee Day

Our Training goes through hands on experience from Real Time Trainers who are part of the current industry. The training program will help you to gain the knowledge required to meet the demands of the clients and the companies.


36.VTPL

Address : VEPSUN Technologies, #100, 104 S.R Arcade, Opp. Viceroy Boulevard, Tulasi Theater Road, Marathahalli

Marathahalli

Location : Marathahalli - Bangalore

Postal Code : 560037

Phone :9036363007

Mobile : 9036363007

Website : http://vepsun.com/

Landmark : oppsite Viceroy Boulyard

Other courses Offered:

• VMware (Virtualization)
• CITRIX XenApp
• CITRIX XenDesktop
• SAN (Storage Area Network)
• CITRIX XenServer
• CLOUD COMPUTING
• LINUX ADMINISTRATION
• MCITP 2008
• CCNA,CCNP,CCIE

37.NEXSYS Technologies

Address : Opp: MEGAMART, Above:NAVEEN KALA Show Room

Maratha halli Main Road, Maratha halli

Location : Marathahalli - Bangalore

Postal Code : 560037

Phone :8065476209

Mobile : 9538174444,9538184444,953819444

Website : www.nexsystechnologies.org

Landmark : On the way to BRANDFACTORY

TRAINING,CONSULTING AND OUTSOURCING


38.DTecH IT Education

Address : No. 1, 1st Cross, 1st main,

Ashwini Layout, Off koramangala ring road

Location : Koramangala - Bangalore

Postal Code : 560047

Phone :08041501359

Mobile : 9741431318

Website : www.dtech-education.com

Landmark : Near Sony world signal

DTecH IT Education is a fast growing Oracle Training company in Bangalore, run by a team of well experienced IT Professionals who have worked for years in IT MNCs. DTecH Team focuses on delivering High Quality Trainings based on real time expertise especially for Working professionals. Our trainings simulate a live corporate training environment with latest technologies being used in delivering the sessions.

Bangalore Transport Corporation

Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC)
The Bengalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) is the agency that operates the public transport bus service in Bengaluru (formerly known as Bangalore), India.

History:

In 1997, BMTC was spun off from the Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation in order to focus exclusively on Bengaluru's rapidly expanding transit needs. The Bengaluru Transport Service became Bengaluru Metropolitan Transport Corporation and the colour scheme was changed from Red to a Blue and White combination.
BMTC remains a division of KSRTC. The profits earned by BMTC are used to offset the losses incurred by the NWKRTC and NEKRTC divisions of KSRTC.

Types of buses:

1. Blue and White:

These buses have been around for ages and the rolling stock is commonly of Tata or Leyland make. Buses of this color scheme that have been introduced after 2001 have pneumatic doors as standard equipment.

2. White and Blue:

The Parisara vahini ordinary buses introduced between 2002 and 2008 with pneumatic doors. The vendors include Eicher Motors, Tata and Leyland.

3. Blue buses:

The new ordinary buses under the JNNURM scheme with low floors and LED boards.

4. Suvarna:

Silver colored with pink lining. The fare on these buses is a Rupee higher for the first three stages in comparison to the ordinary buses, and from then on, the fares are similar. They carry LED route display boards and come with a more stable suspension compared to the previous generation of buses.

5. Pushpak:

Launched in the late 90's as a slightly premium service, these single door bus may run with or without conductors. The Driver may also function as a conductor (janapriya vahini). They are Coffee colored with fares equal to The Suvarna buses.


6. Vajra:

Hi-tech, low-floor, air-conditioned buses from Volvo. They were initially put into service on the IT corridor, but are now running regularly between almost all residential routes as well. The fares are higher, by a factor of about 1.5 to 3 in comparison to the ordinary buses.

7. Vayu Vajra:

Volvo buses to airport operated from 12 routes. They can be identified by the "BIAS" logo on their Route Display Boards.

8. Atal Sarige: Low-cost buses with single seats along the windows and LED display. They sport the Tri-color outside.

9. Marcopolo:

AC buses from Tata have been introduced on routes not covered by Volvo at present.

10. Big 10:

Connects important neighborhoods and obviates the need to use transit hubs, brilliant green coloring with the Big10 logo.

Big 10 arterial roads-junctions (pic courtesy: ABIDe)

11.Big Circle:

Runs on the Outer Ring Road(ORR) of Bengaluru. Distinctly colored with "BigCircle" written all over.

Major bus stations:

1. Kempegowda Bus Station: This is right opposite the city railway station. Bus services are available to the entire city from here. BMTC has a depot here (Depot 7).

2.K. R. Market: Another important bus station located in an area with many private bus services. Buses are available to all parts of Bengaluru besides far off Anekal and Hosur.

3. Shivajinagar: Located in one of Bengaluru's commercial areas and about 2 kms from Bengaluru Cantonment Railway Station.

4. Shantinagar: Near the Central office of KSRTC and BMTC. Tamil Nadu-bound Deluxe buses of SETC TamilNadu and KSRTC start from here. BMTC Depot 2 and Depot
3 are located here. It is well connected to South and South East Bengaluru and the Majestic and Shivajinagar areas.

5. MCTC: Located on Mysore road. Well connected to Mysore road, Vijayanagar and Chamrajpet apart from Market and Majestic. Buses bound to Mysore and
ordinary/express buses towards Tamil Nadu and Kerala start from here.

BANGALORE: The next time a BMTC bus driver does not switch off his engine while waiting at the traffic signal, it might spell his doom. For, 11 mobile teams are on the prowl in the city to keep an eye on the drivers' performance and apprise the Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) of the same.

With focus on conserving fuel, the teams will watch out whether the drivers keep their machines idling or switch them off at the signal lights. Idling means keeping the bus engine operational when the vehicle is stationary and not lugging any load.

Right now, idling happens mostly at traffic signals. Though we have given specific instructions to our drivers to switch off their vehicles when the signals turn red, some drivers still are not following the same. We conduct regular workshops to get drivers improve their skills, which will in turn help us to save on fuel consumption," said Anjum Parwez, MD, BMTC.

 And this is the need of the day, given that a recent study conducted by Clean Air Asia (CAI) has revealed that by reducing the daily idling time of a single bus by 10 minutes, BMTC can look at saving 100 litres of fuel per day. This would mean that the corporation stands a chance to save up to Rs 3 crore for its entire fleet annually. The current daily idling time for a BMTC bus is 45 minutes.

This figure can improve further with driver training, data collection, analysis and maintenance - all this put together can get a savings of almost Rs 23 crore for BMTC, the study notes.

This fact assumes importance given that the Association of State Road Transport Undertakings annual report has stated that fuel costs accounted for almost 35% of a bus corporation's expenses.

As part of the study, CAI examined the fuel efficiency and operational parameters of over 700 buses running on city and inter-city routes and belonging to the BMTC, Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation and State Express Transport Corporation of Tamil Nadu.

The study, conducted in association with the Shakti Foundation, looked into energy conservation. "The detailed study reveals that a number of facts are vital to the health of mass public transport in the country. It shows that minor interventions alone can substantially reduce the cost of fuel for state road transport corporations," said Parthaa Bosu, India Representative of Clean Air Asia. He addeed that there are short and long term measures that can be implemented to get the desired results.

Clean Air Asia:

* Promotes better air quality and livable cities by translating knowledge to policies and actions that reduce air pollution and greenhouse emissions from transport, energy and other sectors

* Was established as leading air quality management network for Asia by Asian Development Bank, World Bank in 2001

* Has been independent non-profit organisation since 2007

BMTC Fleet

Buses 6,500

Trips by every bus per day 20

Daily idling time 45 minutes

For 35 minutes idling time

Diesel saved per day 100 litres

Annual saving Rs 3 crore


Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation

AUM Infotech is a Consortium Partner with SIEMENS

Contributions are the following for this project:

On site Study, Design and Development of the ETM software that is implemented using Ingenico’s ETM.

Interfacing Contactless Smart Card Reader to Ingenico’s ETMs

Assist SIEMENS - On Site Study and development of the Back End Software for the Centralised Fare Collection Software.

Implement the ETMs at Hebbal Depot – Training of Conductors, Customizing the ETM software, maintenance of the ETMs

Manpower support for 24 x 7 Operations of the Data Centre

Manufacture, Supply, Installation and Maintenance of LED based display Boards at Bus Stops, Web Based Display Server Software.

Co-ordination with KEONICS and BMTC


“Make BMTC sustainable, people-centered and choice mode of travel for everyone”

The Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation is the sole public bus transport provider for Bangalore, serving urban, sub-urban and rural areas. BMTC is committed to provide quality, safe, reliable, clean and affordable travel. The testimony of its success lies in increasing passenger trips everyday by a wide range of customer base. In an effort to modernize its services for commuter comfort, BMTC strives to strengthen information systems and improve processes through introduction of intelligent technology solution, make capacity enhancement through infrastructure development, user-friendly interchange facilities, fleet upgradation and augmentation, apart from its core activities, which includes fare structuring, route network optimization, planning and monitoring. BMTC reaches far and wide, in every nook and corner of the city, making public transport an attractive travel choice for everyone. BMTC’s stronghold in the area of public transport in Bangalore is a testimony to its adoption of sound Management, HR, Quality and Environmental policies and strong support from the Government of Karnataka and esteemed passengers.
Our Mission

    Provide people-centered (quality, efficient, integrated and safe) services
    Commuter responsive service planning and promotion
    Optimize resources and build capacity
    Adopt environment-friendly and sustainable practices
    Strengthen commuter feedback mechanism
    Modernize and maintain zero breakdown fleet
    Evolve effective mechanism to monitor service performance
    Conduct safety training, performance audits and awareness for stakeholders
    Increase commercial revenue through monetizing land, buildings & buses
    Increase efficiency in operations and administration
    Ensure inter-agency coordination and multi-modal integration
    Formulate and enforce police measures for sustainability of the service provision
    Implement Intelligent Transport System to improve the quality of service
    Extend travel concession to the weaker sections of the society
    Act as an agent for cultural synthesis and national integration
    Promote research on urban transport




1.BMTC Dispensary

BTS Bus Depot Rd, Shanti Nagar
Bangalore, Tamil Nadu
080 2295 2385

2.Bmtc Controller Room

Kengal Hanumanthaiah Road, Shanti Nagar, Shanti Nagar
Bangalore, Karnataka
080 2295 2422

3.Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation

BTS Bus Depot Road, Shanti Nagar
Bangalore, Karnataka
080 2295 2952

4.Bmtc Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (Head Office)

Address:

(080) 22952536 www.bmtcinfo.com 

2nd Floor, Central Office, K H Road, Shanthinagar, Bangalore - 560027 | View Map

(080) 22952536

18004251663   

Send Enquiry by Email

www.bmtcinfo.com


5.Bangalore Metro Transport Corporation

Address:

(080) 22952311 www.bmtcinfo.com 

Subhash Nagar, Kempegowda Road, Bangalore - 560009 | View Map

9844098194

(080) 22952311, 22952522, 22952534, 22952314, 22952422

www.bmtcinfo.com

6.Bangalore Transport Company , Kalasipalyam , Bangalore

Category: Commercial Transporters

Phone:  (080) 22236085, (080) 22223714

Mobile:  9448471141, 9448052385

Address:   70/36, 3rd Cross, Kalasipalyam, Bangalore- 560002, Karnataka

Landmark:  Near Vegetable Market


7.Bangalore Metro Transport Corporation, Wilson Garden, Bangalore

Phone: 080 - 22952311, 080 - 22952324
Landmark: Near BMTC Bus Stop
Contact Person: Ram Prasad
Address: K.H. Road, Shanthi Nagar
Wilson Garden, Bangalore -560027
Area: Wilson Garden
Email: bmtc@bmtcinfo.com
Website: www.bmtcinfo.com
Working Hours: Monday - Saturday: 8 AM - 5 PM
Categories: Bus Transport Services