Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development

Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development, What is a User Story, What is a Requirement, and Main Differences between User Stories and Requirements.

User stories are used within agile methodology, while requirements documents are associated with the traditional waterfall methodology.

Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development

1) What is a User Story?
2) What is a Requirement?
3) What Are The Main Differences?
4) Categories of Requirement
4a) Functional Requirements
4b) Non-functional Requirements


1) What is a User Story?

User stories are short descriptions of functionality told from the user’s perspective. The focus is on why and how the user interacts with the software.

User stories can be written by just about anyone close to the software,

User stories are written throughout the building of a product. And updating the stories can happen at any time.

Example:
As an Admin user, I want to be able to login to admin interface of the application with valid login credentials.

2) What is a Requirement?

Software requirements describe how the software should act. They are description of features and functionalities of the target system.

Requirements are written by the product manager, product owner, or business analyst. Technical leads are often involved as well as the engineers who will be responsible for working on the features or improvements.

Example: 
Admin User logins to Admin Interface of the System using valid Login Credentials.

Software Development Process

Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development

3) What Are The Main Differences?

In general, user stories are more commonly used within agile methodology, while requirements documents are more commonly associated with the traditional waterfall methodology.

The user story focuses on the experience — what the person using the product wants to be able to do. A traditional requirement focuses on functionality — what the product should do.

User stories are plain and simple, requirements documents go into a lot of detail.

Although the objective of a user story or requirement differ, the goal is always the same — building a product that customers love.

Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development

4) Categories of Requirement

The success of any solution is the product of two aspects:

i) What it does (functionality, features)
ii) How well it performs against defined parameters (non-functional attributes)

4a) Functional Requirements
Functional requirements express function or feature and define what is required.

4b) Non-functional Requirements
Non-functional Requirements define how well, or to what level a solution needs to behave. They describe solution attributes such as security, reliability, maintainability, availability, performance etc,

Requirements vs. User Stories In Software Development

Examples for different type of Requirements

Functional Requirement: Admin User Login to gcrShop Application’s Admin Interface with Valid Login Credentials.

Performance Requirement: 1000 Concurrent Customer Login to and ECommerce Application in 5 seconds…

Usability Requirement: Verify Field Alignments and Font Sizes in the Customer Registration Page

Reliability Requirement: Page Redirecting from Admin Interface to User Interface multiple times continuously

Availability Requirement: 24 hours per day or 24/7/365, system (Web Application) availability

G C Reddy

G C Reddy, Working as a Software Testing Trainer in Hyderabad, India.

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